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Buprenorphine - Two Edged Sword?!?!

Discussion in 'Opiate Withdrawal Treatment' started by princepts, Aug 14, 2015.

  1. princepts

    princepts Member

    It is interesting to read everyone's take on Buprenorphine Treatment. There are so many variables which can influence a negative or positive outlook on Suboxone/Subutex. Some of these include: whether or not addiction is perceived as a disease or not, supplemental therapy or counseling used to aid this type treatment and the general substance abuse history of the recovering addict. Overall, Buprenorphine Treatment is still new. I, for one, will not affirm that it is or is not a sort of crutch to replace opiate abuse. I do believe this though: in light of oxycontin epidemics which swept the nation a decade ago & compared to the average heroin user - the buprenorphine patient is a much more stable person. Their lives can progress forward easier and eliminate the facade of hopelessness often bearing down on drug addicts. By no means do we have a perfect system; yet, this new trend has proved it can deliver the critical thrust against the beast of drug addiction. It can liberate the enslaved and eradicate the bonds of depravity. What we have is suitable because it is effective. Is it a crutch? Maybe so, but being fortunate enough to have something to lean on gives the ailment a chance to heal.

    I would like to read the thoughts you all may have regarding the dynamics of Buprenorphine Treatment.
    ToKenbetrue, missbishi and deanokat like this.
  2. deanokat

    deanokat DrugAbuse.com Community Organizer Community Listener

    @princepts... Thanks for your post.

    My son was addicted to heroin and Suboxone really helped him get off of it. It wasn't the magic elixir by any stretch of the imagination. There was also rehab, therapy, support meetings, etc. But Suboxone kept my son safe and alive at a time I wasn't sure he'd stay alive. So I'm pretty comfortable with saying it saved his life. Is the system perfect? Absolutely not. But when prescribed and monitored by a physician, I believe Suboxone can truly help people change. To the folks who suggest it's not a good way to get clean, I say... Whatever works.
    ToKenbetrue and missbishi like this.
  3. missbishi

    missbishi Community Champion

    All treatment for drug addiction is OK in my book and that includes Suboxone. The thing with opiate addiction is that simply stopping the opiate of choice (be it through cold turkey or drug replacement therapy) is not enough. An addict needs to address the issues which led to them using in the first place. So Suboxone use forms only part of the recovery picture.
    ToKenbetrue and Pugmom like this.
  4. Tryingtoquit

    Tryingtoquit Member

    Its horrible. I used it as a crutch for 6 years. Now withdrawling from it. 6 days now. Worst of the worst withdrawl. Almost unbarable. I wouldnt recommend it for anybody. Unless its prescibed an monitored by a doctor who understands not to use it as a long term med.
  5. deanokat

    deanokat DrugAbuse.com Community Organizer Community Listener

    Being prescribed and monitored by a doctor is the only way Suboxone is meant to be used. Anytime someone uses a powerful RX drug without a doctor's guidance, they're playing with fire IMO.
    ToKenbetrue likes this.
  6. Pugmom

    Pugmom Member

    I was on Suboxone 2 different times for a total of 6 years out of the 11 that I was using. If used correctly and for a short amount of time it is a useful tool. It is a tool NOT a way of life. Because of its half life it is extremely hard to get off of. The thing is that people are not getting off of it properly and then they relapse. I was going to a program the last 3 years and getting Suboxone. They were doctors and nurses and counsellors, it was dual diagnosis place. They had no clue how to properly dispense and wean people off of Suboxone. I got discharged for missing my appt. which meant no more Suboxone. Instead of looking on the streets again I decided to go online and do some research. I weaned myself off properly in 3 months. There was discomfort and a bit of an emotional roller coaster but I stayed strong and did not miss 1 day of work. It was manageable. You just have to be ready!! So I believe subs are poison but it is possible to get off. You can not stop cold turkey!!
    ToKenbetrue and deanokat like this.
  7. ToKenbetrue

    ToKenbetrue Member

    I am in the same boat as your son. And I didn't see a way out, from the opiats. But this is my third month on suboxone and it's working for me. I start IOP next week and have had no relapses, so I say thank GOD for suboxone, I'll take this ANYDAY over running out there looking for pills everyday. It might not be perfect but for right now it's working. Starting to feel normal again.
    deanokat likes this.
  8. deanokat

    deanokat DrugAbuse.com Community Organizer Community Listener

    @ToKenbetrue... I think you said it best when you said, "It might not be perfect but for right now it's working." Progress, not perfection, right? I think too many people are focused on perfection when it comes to recovery. But there are other ways to slay the beast. I'm glad things are working for you. And at some point down the road, when you're ready, you can get off the Suboxone.

    Sending you lots of hope and encouragement, my friend.
    ToKenbetrue likes this.
  9. ToKenbetrue

    ToKenbetrue Member

    I'm new on here, but I really appreciate your words of encouragement. You are a GOD send, most non addicts just judge and berate us. Thanks so much. ..
    deanokat likes this.
  10. ToKenbetrue

    ToKenbetrue Member

    Also, your son and you are in my prayers.
    deanokat likes this.
  11. Coldhotpocket

    Coldhotpocket Member

    Suboxone should not be prescribes for no longer then 2 months and thats still pushin it. If you been on it for years good luck