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Private Online Heroin Support Group

Discussion in 'Heroin' started by HeroinSupport, Mar 2, 2015.

  1. HeroinSupport

    HeroinSupport Member

    We have a private online heroin support group on Facebook with over 33,000 members since we started in August of 2013. You can request to join at www.facebook.com/groups/HeroinSupport . I hope I was allowed to share our group here and if not you can remove my post.

    We are just trying to reach everyone struggling with this disease. We are working on getting our 501c3 nonprofit status in the coming months. We only offer FREE support and there is no fees and we do not allow treatment centers to join our group as to prevent scams and unnecessary pressure on addicts and their families. This group of our ours is a true grassroots effort to have members help each other.
    HeroinSupportFlyer2.png

    www.HeroinSupport.org

    Attached Files:

    Joseph likes this.
  2. Joseph

    Joseph DrugAbuse.com Community Organizer Community Listener

    You are ABSOLUTELY free to share your resources and website here. Our community is just as much about finding and sharing all of the other amazing resources and great work people like yourself are doing to bring awareness to this deadly drug (and any deadly drug for that matter) as it is for people who are struggling the the addiction. Thank you for the amazing work you're doing and certainly let us know how we can help you in your cause! And thank you on behalf of all those who have struggled with this deadly addiction.

    Joe C.
    Community Manager
    DrugAbuse.com
  3. Adrianna

    Adrianna Community Champion

    "Addiction is an illness, not a crime." This is a statement to kind of ponder. It's funny cause I never thought of it as a crime, but since certain drugs are illegal. We know this. An illness. I don't know I think It's a choice. It is a conscious choice. Because you can take two different people and give them the same drug. One the next day or even during the time might say, "I'm never doing that again." The other falls into addiction and can't stay away from it. What defines the two? Statistically what defines the difference between the two people. The choice. I think it has more to do with a combination of things. Rationality and knowing the difference between right and wrong. Intelligence level and perception. When any of this is impaired in any way that choice can be the wrong one. Intelligence can be a touchy subject for some people but it can be raised for almost anyone to a level of competence to make the best decisions, and choices.
    Addiction is defined by the dictionary as; the fact or condition of being addicted to a particular substance, thing, or activity. Ok well I think it is a condition or state that a person is in. This is true. It is a fact that they are in it, but calling it an illness makes it sound terminal or possibly terminal. In other words it may not change. So in this case illness may not be the best word for therapeutic purposes, but may create more of an excuse or crutch. A reason to continue. No, it's not a crime, but it is a choice. Because the law says some are illegal than it is wrong. So making the best choice would make sense. Being prone to it is more like they don't like to be told what to do or they like doing what is wrong. Defiance. It's a state of mind. Interesting topic.
  4. deanokat

    deanokat DrugAbuse.com Community Organizer Community Listener

    @Adrianna... Try this scenario instead: You take two different people and give them the same drug. The next day, one says, "I'm never doing that again" and is able to stick to it. But the other person's brain is wired differently, so even though they, too, may never want to do the drug again, their brain keeps telling them to do it because it found it so pleasurable. And they finally succumb to the brain's message that's saying, "I want more of that!" Technically, it may be a choice, but it's a choice that's being made under undo influence from the brain.