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Why Can’t I Quit Weed?

Discussion in 'Marijuana' started by lonewolves, Jun 4, 2018.

  1. lonewolves

    lonewolves Active Contributor

    I JUST DONT GET IT!

    Addiction is so confusing when you no longer have any positives outweighing your negatives, or any positives at all.

    Pot used to help with my anxiety, sleep, and appetite. Now 10 years later, and it no longer helps me with any of those. I literally only smoke now to stop that stupid addiction voice in my head.

    I’ve basically been spending so much money just to cough up brown/black resin for years.

    I perchased a Volcano vape back in January and told myself I was only allowed to vape my weed from then on. I even destroyed my bong. That worked for a couple of months, but now I’m back to smoking it in a pipe.


    Why can’t I kick this addiction??
  2. Dominica

    Dominica Author, Writer, Recovery Advocate Community Listener

    @lonewolves hey there. i saw a commercial yesterday for a rehab, and they're like "you can't stop using on your own", and well, i questioned that in my head because some people DO stop using on their own.... but then there is a percentage who NEED HELP. professional help....

    maybe that's the route you can think about taking now. figure out whether that's something like an outpatient program or a support group or a counselor or a mixture.... maybe stop trying to do it on your own... :) it's ok and valuable to reach out for help!
    True concern and lonewolves like this.
  3. deanokat

    deanokat DrugAbuse.com Community Organizer Community Listener

    @lonewolves... The marijuana has a psychological hold on you, my friend. In your case, I think getting some professional help would be a good idea. If I were you I would reach out to an addiction specialist or consider trying an outpatient program. Counseling and support group meetings would also be great. Like @Dominica said, it's okay to ask for help!
    True concern and lonewolves like this.
  4. lonewolves

    lonewolves Active Contributor

    You’re right, I’m sure I could find an online addiction counsellor. Unfortunately I live in the extreme north (Alaskan border) and it’s a 4 hour drive just to a bank, pharmacy, even a McDonald’s haha. Health care is the worst up here too. Thankful for this forum, and it’s only been a day!
    True concern and deanokat like this.
  5. RecoveringLife1

    RecoveringLife1 Active Contributor

    lonewolves The easiest way to stay away from your habit is if you don't have access to it. Try making money you use to buy it impossible to get it. You could spend the money on something important or even just treat yourself to shoes, clothes, ect.... You can also try stocks or T Bills and let it sit in the bank. I heard gold is worth a ton. Just invest it in something that's not going to affect your health. You mentioning coughing up brown/black resin is very concerning. Detoxing with natural herbs will take care of that once you stop smoking.
  6. CMMW

    CMMW Senior Contributor

    Hi Dominica,
    I’ve heard you say something similar a few times on here before that some people can do it on their own. Almost as if it’s a common occurrence in the addiction community. This baffles me, I don’t know a single person who hasn’t needed some sort of aid in recovering from they’re addiction be it treatment, AA/NA or counseling. Which is fine but I’m fascinated by addiction especially other people’s views and experiences with it. I guess I only really know mine because I’ve lived it lol. Do you personally know many people who have been able to quit they’re addiction on their own? That would be so interesting. I wish I could pick their brain.
    QUOTE="Dominica, post: 93036, member: 7473"]@lonewolves hey there. i saw a commercial yesterday for a rehab, and they're like "you can't stop using on your own", and well, i questioned that in my head because some people DO stop using on their own.... but then there is a percentage who NEED HELP. professional help....

    maybe that's the route you can think about taking now. figure out whether that's something like an outpatient program or a support group or a counselor or a mixture.... maybe stop trying to do it on your own... :) it's ok and valuable to reach out for help![/QUOTE]
  7. Dominica

    Dominica Author, Writer, Recovery Advocate Community Listener

    @CMMW the thing is, recovery can be different from one person to the next and it's based on so many factors... while jim may be able to get off crack on his own, mary may not... but maybe jim fell in love with a wonderful woman and that was his motivator for getting off it forever.... and maybe mary is so lonely and sad she just keeps going back for tha temporary high...has no idea how to get through those emotions without using.

    there's a great book by Johann Hari’s called “Chasing the Scream”. he talks about a "rat experiment" where basically rats that were in a "rat park" with other rats and toys (a good environment) were much more able to stop addiction than a rat in a "rat park" all alone.... he talks about community and connection as so important, and for some, that may mean reaching out for help to get clean, but for others, it may be a good friendship or partner that helps them want to stop..

    i don't know. many "what ifs" out there.

    i'd say most addicts will need some sort of help to stop their drug of choice.... and maybe many who can quit cold turkey on their own.. maybe their brains are wired differently.

    just a few of my thoughts.
    deanokat, True concern and lonewolves like this.
  8. True concern

    True concern Community Champion

    I agree with your scenario because i got to be honest had i been single and not had a family i desperately wanted to be there for and i heard "You have a month if your lucky"single i would have probably increased my drug use.I believe you are correct that every situation has different variables making every story and outcome different.I do think additional help after the initial detox is most likely always needed because the memories alone will torment a person sober or they do in my case that much i am sure of
    deanokat likes this.
  9. CMMW

    CMMW Senior Contributor

    Indeed everyone’s path to recovery is different but we could play out possible different scenarios over and over. I asked in my last post if you personally know anyone with long term recovery (more than 2 years) who has gotten and stayed sober on their own? Without the help of any treatment, program or counselor. Maybe you didn’t see that part of my last post but I really still like to know.
  10. CMMW

    CMMW Senior Contributor

    I agree with what your saying that people need help to get sober, but they also need help to STAY sober. You know? Sometimes people think that once they’ve gotten through the detox that they’re “all good”. We have to work to stay clean, work a good honest program. Our addiction is never just going to go away. It will always be there ALWAYS. I’ve been sober awhile and I still go to 1 or 2 meetings a week. I’ve had people say to me, do you really still need to be doing that? It’s clear to me then that they don’t understand addiction. My response to them is “hell yeah! If I want to maintain my sobriety, the level of peace and serenity in my life I have to work for it, not only that I enjoy meetings, my fellow addicts and the fellowship” In a side note both of my parents are coming up on 35 years of sobriety! Freaking awesome!!! How did they do it you ask? By going to meetings, helping other addicts/alcoholics, sponsoring people. They were and are willing to do what’s necessary to stay sober. I know folks with 40 and 50 years of sobriety. They all have one thing in common they asked for help and helped the alcoholic/addict who still suffers. Without help it is too much for us

    I a
    True concern likes this.
  11. True concern

    True concern Community Champion

    35 year's props to them that's amazing
  12. CMMW

    CMMW Senior Contributor

    I intended that question for @Dominica but I’m glad you responded and would like anyone else out there to respond as well.
  13. CMMW

    CMMW Senior Contributor

    Oh **** I just saw that I somehow responded to yours. I’m sorry, ugh technology. You’d think I’d be better at it since I’m fairly young. Anyway @Dominica do you personally know anyone who has gotten and stayed sober “on their own” without the aid of treatment, meetings or counseling? And I don’t mean got sober for a short time, but someone with years and years of sobriety with no help at all?
  14. True concern

    True concern Community Champion

    Ya no you saw it,i deleted it because i saw it wasn't for me after i answered and then i felt stupid lol.That was my fault not yours
  15. CMMW

    CMMW Senior Contributor

    Don’t ever feel stupid, please! You are not in the least! I promise you I every time you post I feel privileged to get to read it. You have taught me a lot and contribute so much to this forum. I appreciate your honesty, your openness to new ideas and advice as well as your willingness to change and look within. I really think you’ve got what you need to stay sober. Not only do you offer great insight but you take it as well. Not everyone can do that.
    True concern likes this.
  16. True concern

    True concern Community Champion

    Thank you.I try and im trying.
    deanokat likes this.
  17. deanokat

    deanokat DrugAbuse.com Community Organizer Community Listener

    For what it's worth, I know a few people who have gotten and stayed clean and sober without any help from AA, NA, a counselor, etc. That said, all of those people had some help from family and friends. So I don't know if that technically counts as having done it on their own. One thing's for certain, though: I think the vast majority of people DO require help.
    True concern likes this.
  18. Dominica

    Dominica Author, Writer, Recovery Advocate Community Listener

    @CMMW one of my exes got sober without assistance.... and couple friends from high school, but not sure they were actually alcoholics... could have just been heavy drinkers partying for a while.

    i think most people with addiction issues need some sort of help...
    True concern likes this.
  19. CMMW

    CMMW Senior Contributor

    Have they stayed sober since?
  20. CMMW

    CMMW Senior Contributor

    It’s something like 90% of addicts/alcoholics never seek help, never go to treatment or meetings, they die from their addiction. Then 10% of us will get help, and try to get sober. Of that 10% 1/2 will eventually succeed and get sober. The odds are against us, we have to fight really hard to be in that 5%. Like really hard. It seems foolish to me to tell an addict that some people do it on their own even if you say some need help because I have an addict mind, and I know how addicts think. We’re not going to listen to the second 1/2 of that sentence because it seems harder. We like the easier softer way. Of course they’re going to try that way. 99.9% of us can’t quit on our own. In my mind addiction is urgent. And getting sober is urgent. And it feels like a waste to time telling an addict it’s possible to do it on their own because the likelihood of that is so so incredibly slim. They may not have time to figure that out. To me urging addicts to seek serious treatment better serves them.